We arrive via ferry and wander around to find beachfront accomodation, which ends up being an expensive ($25/night) bungalow on the sand. Techno music pretty much plays all night, but I am way partied out from Full Moon Party, even though weeks have gone by, so I find it a bit annoying. It is a fairly touristy spot that I wouldn’t really visit again, but the whole point of coming is to get some more scuba diving in and I must say we have a fabulous set of dives. Little seahorses and pretty fish and turtles and obviously the 28C water doesn’t hurt either.

All the details: Koh Phi Phi diving

Cost: As a certified diver, explore a variety of sites with Sea Frogs Diving Centre for 2000-3000THB per 2 dives.

Getting there: Ferries constantly make the 2 hour journey between Phuket and Koh Phi Phi for about 400THB.

Top tips: Don’t stay in one of the beachfront bungalows if you are easily bothered by noise— there seem to be frequent parties that go through the entire night.

Koh Tao, where we got certified a few weeks ago, has a reputation for great diving, but this reputation has brought a lot of divers, which has subsequently scared off a lot of the aquatic life. Koh Phi Phi doesn’t see quite the same volume of divers, so the sea life is a bit better, but I can’t wait to dive in some more remote places. Even the Great Barrier Reef could be considered more populated with animals, and that’s not to say it isn’t a popular spot, but it’s a massive reef that has thousands of dive sites, so it has lots of happy reef sharks and giant turtles swimming about.

Sadly, Koh Phi Phi is our last destination, so we ferry our way back to Phuket to fly back to Sydney. I can’t believe our South East Asia trip is done already, but I feel quite confident that I will be back.

Read more about our travels through Thailand:

BANGKOK’S CRAZY KOH SAN ROAD

BECOMING DIVE PROS ON KOH TAO

SURVIVING THAILAND’S INFAMOUS FULL MOON PARTY

ON TO PHUKET

TROPICAL PARADISE ON KOH LANTA

PHOTO JOURNAL: DROP EVERYTHING AND GO TO THAILAND